Humen Body Facts

Baby Bones

A Human Body has 99 more bones than an adult.

A baby’s skeleton is mostly made up of cartilage. As a person grows up, most of this cartilage turns into adult bone through a process called ossification. This process results in the fusing of certain bones. Consequently, newborn babies have around 305 bones, while an adult has just 206 bones.

A Few Small Pieces

An adult human being is made of approximately 7,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 atoms. (For reference, that’s 7 Octillion, or more than 7 trillion trillion.)

Obviously, this varies based on the size of the person and their body composition

Born To Be Astronauts

We’ve all seen the movies: if you’re ever thrown out into the vacuum of space, you can basically expect to disintegrate, right? Or your blood will boil, or something.

Not true! Turns out, we’re made of tougher stuff than Hollywood seems to think. For example, although many liquids do boil in open space, our blood is kept in check by our circulatory system and would, therefore, be OK. Freezing isn’t a concern either, as a vacuum actually acts as a pretty good insulator.

It’s not all good news though: your death would still be pretty gruesome. The lack of air will render you unconscious in about 15 seconds… before you asphyxiate and die in about a minute. Then your body would float alone through the vast emptiness of space until… Look, it gets ugly. That’s all we’ll say about that.

Noses > Eyes

Researchers estimate that the average human being can distinguish between 1 trillion different odors. This is much more acute than the human eye, which can distinguish only about 10 million different colors.

Noses truly are the vanilla of the human body: wildly underappreciated, and they smell great.

Humans Are Gross

Ready to get grossed out?

In a lifetime, an average person produces about 25,000 quarts of saliva—enough to fill two swimming pools. We also produce about a liter of mucus per day.

Interestingly enough, though, all that saliva plays an absolutely crucial role in keeping us clean. Consequently, people who have low levels of saliva are far more vulnerable to oral infections and cavities.

Mining The Body

Your body has enough iron in it to forge a metal nail that is 3-inches long. You also have enough sulfur to kill all fleas on an average dog, enough carbon to make 900 pencils, enough potassium to fire a toy cannon, enough fat to make 7 bars of soap, enough phosphorous to make 2,200 match heads, and enough water to fill a ten-gallon tank.

Close Your Eyes

We all have tiny mites living in our eyelashes. These little mites actually aren’t too choosey; they’ll live anywhere as long as they have access hair follicles. They’re found on other parts of the body and on a host of other mammals.

The Strongest Muscle In The Body

Pound for pound, the strongest muscle in the human body is the masseter (jaw muscle). It can clamp your chompers shut with 55 pounds of force on the incisors and 200 pounds of force on the molars.

Stinky Humans

Sweat itself is odorless. It’s the bacteria on the skin that mingles with it and produces body odor. Bacteria that are naturally present on our skin thrive in sweaty regions.

Growing Strong

Your ears and nose will never stop growing until the day you die.

In fact, your earlobes will also elongate from gravity.

Don’t Lick The Gun

Similar to fingerprints, everyone also has a unique tongue print. It may be some time before your local police station starts taking tongue prints, but research on the required 3-D imaging technology is already being developed and tested.

Remember: if you’re ever going to get involved in a million-dollar art heist, or some kind of grisly murder, absolutely do not lick the crime scene.

Steel Bones

Ounce for ounce, human bones are stronger than steel. A cubic inch of bone can bear a load of 19,000 lbs.—roughly the weight of five pickup trucks.

Reminder: this is not a dare. Do not (for example) ask your friends to drive 5 loaded pickup trucks over your forearm. It won’t end well.

Brain Power

Your brain accounts for only 2% of your body weight, yet it uses 20% of the total oxygen and blood in your body.

It’s fascinating. That little grey blob weighs just about 4 pounds, and yet is quite possibly responsible for essentially all of our success as a species.

This also shows that, at least when it comes to brain power, bigger is not always better. Cows, whales, and elephants (in addition to many other creatures) all have much bigger brains than we do. And yet we eat steak like it’s no big deal. Guess we’re winning, right?

The Ultimate Betrayal

Within three days of death, the enzymes that once digested your dinner begin to eat you. Ruptured cells will become food for the bacteria in your gut, which will release enough noxious gas to bloat your body and force your eyes to bulge outward.

Whatever happened to loyalty?

Super Storage

In a lifetime, your brain’s long-term memory can hold up to 1 quadrillion (1 million billion) bits of information.

And for such a powerful computer, it’s also incredibly efficient. The entire apparatus of your brain is operated by roughly the same amount of power as a 10-Watt lightbulb.

Not-So Hairless Apes

It might not seem like it when you look around, but human beings actually have just as many hair follicles as a chimpanzee.

Here’s the catch: our hairs are, for the most part, incredibly fine and light-colored. No one is quite sure why we lost our impressive fur coats, though. Some think it was an adaption to help us sweat more effeciently. Others say it was a method for avoiding fleas and ticks.

Whatever the reason, it’s a fun thought.

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